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RARS Repeaters

RARS operates and maintains three analog FM repeaters in the Triangle. The repeaters are "open" and available for use by all appropriately licensed amateur radio operators who follow the rules, including our expectations for behavior on our repeaters. Please see our Repeater Operating Guide for more information.

W4DW 146.64 MHz -0.6 MHz, no PL tone

Known as the "6-4" repeater, this is our "flagshipā€¯ machine, located near the State Fairgrounds in west Raleigh.

We hold the RARS 2-Meter Net on this machine at 8:00 pm every evening except Saturday. The Tech and Trader's Net is at 8:00 pm on Saturday. The RARS Amateur Radio News Hour follows the 2-Meter Net on Sundays. The Apex Emergency Response Communications Net is at 9:00 pm on Sundays. This repeater is also the home of the Sixty-Four on Six-Four operating award.

W4DW 145.13 MHz -0.6 MHz, 82.5 PL tone

This is our "western" repeater. Located near the RDU airport, this repeater covers the western end of Wake County and into Durham County.

W4RNC 444.525 MHz + 5.0 MHz, 82.5 PL tone

This is the Bayleaf repeater. It sits at the northern-most point of I-540. This repeater is accessible in southern Granville County and east out to Wake Forest and Knightdale.

Programming Your Radios for the RARS Repeaters

You will need the frequency, offset, and PL tone (where applicable) above to program your radio for the RARS repeaters.

The use of programming software and an interface cable is highly recommended. This file contains the information above in a comma-separated format that can be imported into most programming software. Click on the link to download it and then follow the directions for your programming software to import it.

The file was prepared using CHIRP, a free and open source tool for programming a long list of radios. Importing CSV files into CHIRP can be a little tricky, so follow the directions carefully.

We can't provide technical support for the file, but if you have any problems programming your radio, bring your gear to the next RARS Gathering and someone there might be able to help you.

Other Area Clubs' Repeater Pages

Since repeaters are generally sponsored by an amateur radio club, one of the best sources of repeater information is a club's repeater page (like this one). Here are links to the repeater pages of some of the clubs in and near the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Triangle.

A Few Resources for Finding Other Repeaters

Clubs aren't the only repeater sponsors. Sometimes individual radio amateurs or groups of independent radio amateurs sponsor repeaters. Sometimes those repeaters are linked together in what is known as a "link system," so that the input to one repeater in the system is retransmitted by all the other repeaters in the system. Additional resources for finding repeaters, including link systems, are listed below.

  • The semi-famous KA2DEW list of open analog repeaters in and around the Triangle.
  • The Carolina 440 UHF Link System, with coverage from the Triangle east to the Outerbanks and southeast to the coast from Emerald Isle to Murrells Inlet, SC
  • The PRN DMR repeater network in North Carolina, Virginia, South Carolina, and, believe it or not, Texas. This is a system of linked digital mobile radio (DMR) repeaters.
  • RepeaterBook for a searchable database
  • SERA Band Plans. The South Eastern Repeater Association Inc., SERA, coordinates repeaters in the southeastern states of WV, VA, KY, TN, NC, SC, MS, and GA
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RARS · P.O. Box 17124 · Raleigh, NC 27619-7124